French Open 2011

This category contains 34 posts

Li Na: What she said, really meant and definitely did not


Li Na and Ioana Raluca Olaru at the 2009 US Open

Li Na Is From Venus

What she said:

"Women cannot have the same mentality of men, who expect to win every competition."

Li Na is inventive with her excuse for not doing well post her Roland Garros triumph this year. The Chinese woman became the first Asian ever to win a Grand Slam at the French Open.

What she really meant:

“Sports requires us (women) to be takers. But we’re givers (by nature)—just ask my hubby and my opponents.”

What she definitely didn’t:

“Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf, Monica Seles and Serena Williams are more than pleased with this explanation.”

Li Na: What she said, really meant and definitely did not


Li Na at the 2009 US Open

What she said:

“My ultimate goal is to become a housewife.”

Li Na is not burdened by public expectations and will feel content if she fulfils her ultimate goal of being a housewife.

What she really meant:

“Now, that my husband’s not my coach, maybe it’s time I was a good wife to him.”

What she definitely didn’t:

“How do you like my house-hubby?”

Will Roger Federer continue his descent from the totem pole?


Roger Federer - Australian Open 2009

Roger Federer won his last major in January 2010 in Melbourne at the Australian Open.

The six majors that followed were divided among two bionic contestants, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

The Spaniard claimed four, the Serb two.

Has the Swiss truly fallen by the wayside?

Continue reading

Greg Rusedski: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Greg Rusedski Practicing At The 2004 U.S. Open

What he said:

"You are talking a 0.5% improvement."

Greg Rusedski is confident that Andy Murray has the ability to win Wimbledon.

What he really meant:

“It’s the small things that matter.”

What he definitely didn’t:

“0.5% will take 99.5% of his time and effort.”

Roger Federer versus Rafael Nadal, Interloper Novak Djokovic


Novak Đoković (Djokovic) hits a volley during ...

Just one Grand Slam final in over two years between the giants that straddle the men’s circuit. Yet fans and critics alike are terming it a revival of the Fedal rivalry.

Is it, really?

It cannot be much of a competition if the duo have faced off just once in the last eight Slams.

Continue reading

‘Red, Red Clay’ by Francesca Schiavone and Li Na


Red Red Wine 

Li Na finally won her first major at the ripe, old age of 29.

Francesca Schiavone’s hopes of defending her 2010 title were dashed by the daughter of a former badminton player. Li Na was told to switchover to tennis at eight by her coach. 

If there is a theme song for  the two unlikely protagonists in yet another fairy-tale ending at Roland Garros, it can only be ‘Red Red Clay’, a modified version of UB40’s ‘Red Red Wine’.

Continue reading

Li Na: What she said, really meant and definitely did not


Li Na at 2008 Fortis Championships Luxembourg

What she said:

“Age just paper.It’s just plus one.”

Li Na says that the age factor in the women’s final is not such a big deal.

What she really meant:

“Hell, Francesca’s just a year older than me.”

What she definitely didn’t:
“Ageism? What’s that?”

 

Roger Federer: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Roger Federer At The 2002 U.S. Open (a clearer...

What he said:

"It’s a good present because he [Nadal] had been struggling against him lately."

Roger Federer plays some mind games before the final claiming that he has done his rival, Rafael Nadal, a favour by knocking out Novak Djokovic.

What he really meant:

“Whom would Nadal prefer meeting in the final? An older foe or a younger one?”

What he definitely didn’t:

“I’ll roll over and play dead.”

Li Na: What she said, really meant and definitely did not


Chinese Tennis player Li Na on the opening day...

What she said:

“I’m not old. Why do you think I’m old? I feel I’m still young."

Li Na is not old—according to her—on the WTA Tour.

What she really meant:

“Age is a state of mind.”

What she definitely didn’t:

“I’m a spring chicken.”

Francesca Schiavone: What she said, really meant and definitely did not


Italian Tennis player Francesca Schiavone duri...

What she said:

"Okay, we only have about 70 million. But we have big hearts."

Francesca Schiavone is heartened by just 70 million compatriots’ support for the French Open final.

What she really meant:

“Numbers? Numbers mean nothing to me.”

What she definitely didn’t:

“Italians have heart problems.”

Number of readers subscribed

Read it on Apple News

Read it on Apple News

Read it on Apple News

Blog Stats

  • 102,167 hits

Stat Counter

RSS Sports, Health and Exercise

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
%d bloggers like this: