maninder singh

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Narendra Hirwani: What he said, really meant and definitely didn’t


Narendra Hirwani is quite a halwai (maker of sweets).

What he said:

“Many of my students at my academy in Indore tell me: ‘Sir, I have bowled 60 balls. Sir, I have bowled 50 balls today.’ I tell them: if you want to make cream, you have to condense it, and that only happens after boiling it for a period of time. A good rabri [sweet] is made only when the cream rises. For quality you need quantity.”

Narendra Hirwani asserts that young cricketers do not bowl enough in the nets.

Nagraj Gollapudi chaired five experts—Bishan Bedi, Maninder Singh, Narendra Hirwani, Murali Kartik and Amol Muzumdarin a far-ranging discussion that delved into the reasons behind the dearth of quality spinners on the Indian scene.

Hirwani added:

“I would bowl minimum of 90 overs a day as a youngster at the Cricket Club of Indore. I would bowl at just one stump for a couple of hours. In all, I would bowl for a minimum of five hours. If you are bowling at one stump you end up bowling about 30 overs in an hour. This kind of training, bowling at one stump, is equivalent to vocalists doing riyaaz [music practice]. You build your muscle memory.”

What Hirwani really meant:

“Practice does make perfect. You have to make spin bowling a secondary habit before you can add variety to your armor. Your fundamentals have to be sound.”

What he definitely didn’t:

“Good coaches can incentivize young bowlers by offering them sweetmeats as rewards. The creamier the better. More malai (cream) and maalish (massage) for more majdoori (hard work).

Fake Quinton De Kock: What he said, really meant and definitely didn’t


Fake Quinton De Kock

What he said:

A fake Quinton De Kock Twitter account was in the news with leading dailies attributing the above tweet to  the chubby-faced South African opening bat.

Saeed Ajmal has been banned with immediate effect from all international cricket after his bowling action was deemed illegitimate by the ICC.

Bio-mechanic analysis revealed the the Pakistani off-spinner flexed his elbow as much as 35 degrees against the permitted 15 degrees.

The bowler can apply for a reassessment anytime once his action has been rectified. However, he is permitted to take part in domestic cricket under the supervision of his country’s cricketing board, the PCB.

Maninder Singh, a former India left-arm spinner, squarely blamed the ICC for the current mess.

He said:

“”The problem started with Muralitharan. The menace should have been stopped then. If that had happened, all boards would have taken steps to prevent this.Now it (chucking) has become a norm, it is like ‘if he (Murali) can do it, anyone can’.” 

On young bowlers choosing the wrong role models:

“This has ruined careers. Whether you call it 12 or 15 degrees, it is to be blamed.” 

On why English and Australian bowlers are not called that often:

“People there are basically honest, and they will own up. We don’t, and in fact start backing them.” 

Former India all-rounder Madan Lal said:

“”Even in my academy, so many boys bend their elbows. They see lot of cricket on TV and try to imitate them. It gets difficult to correct them once they are set in their ways.” 

English: Saeed Ajmal in the field during a 50-...

English: Saeed Ajmal in the field during a 50-over warm-up match against Somerset at the County Ground, Taunton, during Pakistan’s 2010 tour of England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saeed Ajmal’s reactions:

“It is disappointing to learn the result of the biomechanic test in Brisbane but I have not given up. I don’t see the ban as a major problem as I know I can work out on the flaws and make a comeback.

Obviously, I have to follow their advice but from what I know is that once we get the full medical report, we have a right of appeal and to challenge these findings.

I want to play in the World Cup and see my country doing well and I will do whatever it takes to be ready for the tournament. I am a fighter and I know what I have to do to get back into international cricket before the World Cup.” 

 

Bishan Singh Bedi tweeted:

Speaking to the Times of India, Bedi said:

“”It was inevitable. But it’s a decision taken too late, when all the damage has been done and Ajmal has taken so many wickets in international cricket.

What was the ICC doing till now? All those batsmen who lost their wickets to him, all those teams which lost a game because of an Ajmal spell, should they now come forward and say we have been wronged? If they can’t, then what is the point of rehabilitating these bowlers.”

Bedi added:

“Most people who claim to be mystery spinners enjoy an unfair advantage because they are being allowed to bowl illegal deliveries.What is the point of correcting their action in a laboratory and then letting them loose? Is the ICC a reformatory school? A chucker cannot reform. He is merely rendered ineffective.”

What the Fake Quinton De Kock really meant:

“Saeed Ajmal can’t bowl! Saeed Ajmal can’t bowl! With or without his 35 degrees of hyper extension…Ajmal can’t bowl…”

What he definitely didn’t (or did he?) :

“I’m famous, not Quinton De Kock.”

 

Murali erupts, at last! Bedi bears the brunt!


July 22, 2010 - Galle, Sri Lanka - epa02257464 Sri Lanka's bowling wizard celebrates during the tri series test match versus India in Galle, 115kms south of Colombo, Sri Lanka, 22 July 2010. Murali retired from the Test version of cricket but said he would play for the 2011 World Cup if the Sri Lankan selectors requested. With the world's highest Test wickets of 800 under his belt, Muralitharan was given a grand send off at the Galle International Cricket Stadium.

Prologue

The controversy over Muttiah Muralitharan’s bowling action will not abate.

Just when we believed that Murali would waltz off into the sunset – peaking at 800 Test wickets – we find alarm bells tinkling in the Indian media.

Bishan Singh Bedi was among those who remarked on  Murali’s latest achievement but qualified his congratulations saying that he thought that Murali was a lovely person and a nice chap (something on those lines) but he believed that the ICC had bent its rules to accommodate his equally bent arm. He pronounced him a chucker and maintained that he would always consider him one.

His protégé, Maninder Singh, echoing his godfather,penned a column noting that Murali would always remain a disputable figure because of his unorthodox action.

Over the years, Murali appeared to have chugged along smoothly without responding in kind to any of the criticisms. He preferred to have his supple fingers do the talking and let the ICC decide on the legality of his action. That seemed good enough for him.

But all that changed this week, when Murali in an interview with the Indian TV news channel, Times Now, went on the offensive, claiming that there is a lot of jealousy about his achievements among former players. He targeted Bishan Singh Bedi and lambasted him, disparaging him as “an ordinary bowler”.

Quote of the day:
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye. – Miss Piggy

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