test wickets

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More thoughts on the Mohali cracker!


India's Pragyan Ojha (R), Vangipurappu Laxman (rear, obscured) and Laxman's runner Suresh Raina (L) celebrate India's victory over Australia on the fifth day of their first test cricket match in Mohali October 5, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Caballero-Reynolds (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)

To put it succinctly: India won a match they should have lost. Australia lost a game they should have won.

Neither team deserved to lose and it was a great advertisement for Test cricket. That’s what Test cricket is all about. It’s not over until it’s truly over!

The difference was that man VVS Laxman, who reserves his best for the kangaroos.

The Aussies kept digging into their marsupial pockets for ways to counter the Hyderabadi’s merry march to victory but there were just no tricks up their sleeves.

Ricky Ponting, unlike his predecessor, Steve Waugh, seems to ,more often than not, let the game drift and that was to be the case once more when the Aussies, by rights, should have gone in for the kayo.

No discredit to the fighting qualities exhibited by Laxman, Sharma and Ojha but Ponting needs a new thinking cap and soon!

In the end, it was yet another famous victory for the No. 1 Test team and Dhoni must thank his stars that he can call upon players of the calibre of Tendulkar, Dravid and Laxman to do yeoman service without throwing any starry tantrums.

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Murali erupts, at last! Bedi bears the brunt!


July 22, 2010 - Galle, Sri Lanka - epa02257464 Sri Lanka's bowling wizard celebrates during the tri series test match versus India in Galle, 115kms south of Colombo, Sri Lanka, 22 July 2010. Murali retired from the Test version of cricket but said he would play for the 2011 World Cup if the Sri Lankan selectors requested. With the world's highest Test wickets of 800 under his belt, Muralitharan was given a grand send off at the Galle International Cricket Stadium.

Prologue

The controversy over Muttiah Muralitharan’s bowling action will not abate.

Just when we believed that Murali would waltz off into the sunset – peaking at 800 Test wickets – we find alarm bells tinkling in the Indian media.

Bishan Singh Bedi was among those who remarked on  Murali’s latest achievement but qualified his congratulations saying that he thought that Murali was a lovely person and a nice chap (something on those lines) but he believed that the ICC had bent its rules to accommodate his equally bent arm. He pronounced him a chucker and maintained that he would always consider him one.

His protégé, Maninder Singh, echoing his godfather,penned a column noting that Murali would always remain a disputable figure because of his unorthodox action.

Over the years, Murali appeared to have chugged along smoothly without responding in kind to any of the criticisms. He preferred to have his supple fingers do the talking and let the ICC decide on the legality of his action. That seemed good enough for him.

But all that changed this week, when Murali in an interview with the Indian TV news channel, Times Now, went on the offensive, claiming that there is a lot of jealousy about his achievements among former players. He targeted Bishan Singh Bedi and lambasted him, disparaging him as “an ordinary bowler”.

Quote of the day:
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye. – Miss Piggy

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Adios, Murali: The Final Musketeer


Sri Lanka's Muttiah Muralitharan (C) shows the ball as team mates carry him on their shoulders after he took his 800th wicket during the fifth day of their first test cricket match against India in Galle July 22, 2010. Muralitharan on Thursday became the first bowler to take 800 test wickets. The 38-year-old Muralitharan, the leading wicket-taker in tests and one-day internationals, dismissed India's Pragyan Ojha to reach the milestone in his last test match appearance.  REUTERS/Andrew Caballero-Reynolds (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)

Suddenly there were none!

The Galle test this week brought down the curtain on the career of the last of the three spinning maestros of this generation.

Much has already been written about Muttiah Muralitharan’s exit from the cricketing stage, and many more reams of paper will be consumed describing his exploits in his swan song test at Galle. Murali ended his Test career on a high against his Indian opponents claiming the requisite eight wickets to perch himself atop the summit of 800 wickets – master of all he surveys – in the process ensuring victory for his Sri Lankan teammates.

Murali , Shane Warne and Anil Kumble were the foremost exponents of spin bowling of this generation. Each alike the other but yet very dissimilar. Will there be any more  like them?

They were the three Musketeers of spin bowling; their sovereign – the Art Of Spin Bowling. Come flat tracks, come bouncy ones, come true ones, come lousy ones, come under-prepared ones, come turners,come rain, come shine, they were forever on call to serve their master, to do him proud. All-weather heroes, I term them!

Quote of the day:
You’ve achieved success in your field when you don’t know whether what you’re doing is work or play. – Warren Beatty

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