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This tag is associated with 27 posts

Shahid Afridi: What he said, really meant and what you wish he said


Shahid Khan Afridi

What he said:

“I was a hero for them after the World Cup and suddenly I became zero.”

Shahid Afridi is quite certain that the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) flip-flops in its attitude  to him. Ijaz Butt, PCB Chairman, is the target of his ire. The former Pakistan captain labelled PCB officials hypocrites calling them ‘two-faced’ for blaming him for the ODI losses in the Windies despite his non-involvement in the selection process.

What he really meant:

“Butt thinks I’m good as long as I’m good to him.Convenient.”

What you wish he said:

“PCB officials would be excellent advisors on how to build roller-coasters.”

England Lord it over Team India in first Test


England cricket Captain Kevin Pietersen at The...

Mahendra Singh Dhoni had this to say about the first Test loss at Lords: “What could go wrong, went wrong.”

The Indian skipper attributed the defeat to three factors: Zaheer Khan’s injury, the lack (consequently) of a third seamer (the Jharkhand native rolled his arm over) and misfortunes (Gautam Gambhir’s elbow blow and Sachin Tendulkar’s viral flu) that forced the reshuffling of the batting order in the final innings.

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Alastair Cook: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Alastair Cook catching in the nets at Adelaide...

What he said:

“The cricketing gods might look down in a bit of disgust.”

Alastair Cook is not too happy with Sri Lankan batters, who appeared to lose sight of the target in the attempt to ensure that Dinesh Chandimal reached his century at Lord’s.

What he really meant:

“The rain gods did not oblige us with a wash-out. Why should they favour Sri Lanka and particularly Dinesh Chandimal? ”

What he definitely didn’t:

“I would not have had much to say had Sri Lanka batted first.”

“I’d better say something critical before any one points out how long I took to make my ton.”

Nick Bollettieri: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Nick Bollettieri at the 2006 US Open doing a t...

What he said:

“I can tell you one thing, Nadal doesn’t burn the candle at two ends.”

Nick Bollettieri, celebrated tennis coach, is convinced that a big reason for Rafael Nadal’s and Roger Federer’s continued success is dedication to the craft and very little off-court activities or late-night partying.

What he really meant:

“Nadal has a schedule and sticks to it. No half-measures in practice either.”

What he definitely didn’t:

“I can tell you a million and one things, but do you want to hear them all?”

Ryan Harrison:What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Ryan Harrison

What he said:

"I’ve been in trouble with [my temper] since I was young.When I was 5, 6 years old, every single time I got mad or threw a racket, I had to do 20 push-ups. And it wasn’t that I stopped the racket throwing or getting mad — I just did a lot of push-ups."

Ryan Harrison, the hope of American men’s tennis, admits he has a temper from an early age and was penalised for it—often.

What he really meant:

“I’ve always had a vile temper.”

What he definitely didn’t:

“I love doing push-ups.”

Stuart Law: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


Ian Bell preparing for the 4th Ashes test 2005...

What he said:

“It was another great innings today. He’s a pain in the backside, to be honest.”

Sri Lankan coach, Stuart Law, minces no words in his assessment of Ian Bell’s contribution to his side’s travails in the Test series against England.

What he really meant:

“Bell has been the backbone of this English side—to our detriment.”

What he definitely didn’t:

“I’ve ordered extra padding in our players’ trouser seats. And loads of Zandu balm.”

Wimbledon 2011: Maria Sharapova favoured to clinch her fourth major


Maria Sharapova practicing in Indian Wells, Ca...

Wimbledon, the Williams and Caroline Wozniacki.

The trio of Ws coming together could generate more than enough hype and hoopla to keep sports writers busy for the next 14 days.

Maria Sharapova is making headlines—not for her fashion sense, boyfriends or her clothing line—but for her tennis. A fabulous run at the French Open reminded players and fans alike why she was considered one of the most exciting talents to burst onto the WTA tour at 17.

Li Na—her first ever major at Roland Garros—and a billion-plus Chinese fans ignited a Marco Polo-like rush to discover the next Chinese star.

The withdrawal of Kim Clijsters—an aggravation of her ankle injury—means that the Belgian is—for all practical purposes—-hobbled in her farewell year.

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Andrew Strauss: What he said, really meant and definitely did not


What he said:

"It’s one of the better items of post you get through the letterbox – certainly better than a gas bill."

English Test skipper, Andrew Strauss, is suitably chuffed at being annointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire.

What he really meant:

"Are you enthused about bills, especially utilities? Not me. This is one piece of post I’m thrilled to receive."

What he definitely didn’t:

"The sun never sets on the British Empire—not the cricketing one."

Cricket and basketball: The Iffy Debate (Humour)


President Barack Obama holds a personalized te...

If the Indian cricket team had selected Baba Ramdev as the team physio, then the men in blue could have been as flexible on the field as the sadhu himself. However, his insidious influence would rub off on them and at the first signs of terror from pace bowlers, bruised batsmen would migrate to women’s cricket.

If Barack Obama were to lose the 2012 Presidential elections, he could always consider coaching the Los Angeles Lakers. “Yes, we can” would resonate with Lakers fans, too. “It’s not the economy, stupid” could do just as well.

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Jacques Rogge: ‘Shoe throwing could become an Olympic sport’ (Satire)


IOC President Jacques Rogge with Pierre DeCoub...

LONDON—

Jacques Rogge, President of  the International Olympic Committee has given his backing to shoe-throwing making a bid to become an Olympic sport.

Rogge said he would welcome an application from the International Shoe-Throwers Association (ISTA). If successful, shoe-throwing could feature at the 2020 Olympics.

Shoe-throwing is a recent phenomenon and has gained popularity across the globe in recent times.

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